• gonzman_2002

    How would one do this? could an electrical cord with stripped wires and one in one side of the garden and the other on the other side work?

    • Keith

      electrodes are placed in the soil. cord is how you get electricity to the electrodes. AC currents seem to hurt plants small DC current seem to help.

      • gonzman_2002

        Okay, so is this practical for outdoor gardens?

        • Keith

          To be clear, the question “Is it practical” is really asking does the increase in crop growth justify or offset the expense, and extra work to set it up.

          I’m not the one to ask to answer the question. People have experimented in electric fertilizer. Some times it seems to help, some times it seems to hurt. Most experimenters are not keeping good enough records of soil type, moisture, current and voltage levels, as well as crop types, or cost of setup, and how long does it last as well as ongoing electricity cost to scientifically answer your question, “is it practical”.

          You can give it a try on a small scale and see if it works well enough to try on a larger scale.

          • gonzman_2002

            That answers the question perfectly. Thanks.

        • I think it’s practical, yet like Keith said, more solid research is needed. There are also other things to consider when attempting to make it practical for use in outdoor garden use. These include:
          – electrode selection & layout
          – wiring & connections, i.e . how to best build out a electrifying network technically & practically – like where to put wires so you dont trip over them, or break connections inadvertently, etc.
          – stimulation matters – like over-stimulation possibilities

          My main point is that it is practical, but there is a lot to think abut, perhaps akin to planning out a drip-irrigation system.

          • Keith

            I find this subject interesting. I also wonder why the field has not had a lot more serious sciencetific studies. Historically, weve seen the rise of fertilizers as man made sources of nitrogen has become cheaper over the last 100 years or so. If this electric fertilizer is actually helping bacteria supply nitrogen to plants, it might explain why famers have adoped cheaper, more easily controled doses from from urea and amonia.