Weber and Lang are a father and son duo who are obsessed with electroculture almost as much as I am. In this brief post, I’d like to share with you some of the amazing gains that these guys achieved by simply applying 5 Volts to a number of tomato plants grown in 5 gallon buckets…

In preparation for science fair season. Lang and his dad got in touch with me to get advice on running some electro-horticulture experiments. They found that by growing tomato plants in a drought-resistant grow system called a sub-irrigation planter (SIP) they didn’t have to worry about watering as much, since it became something they just needed to do every few days rather than daily.

These guys have done a great job with their experiments… Over 2-3 seasons they have consistently achieved yield gains of over 50% by weight. Similar results can be seen by looking at how well my friend Bill did in his electrified home garden. If you take a look at the pictures below, you’ll also see that the plants themselves tend to grow faster as well.

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In a recent experiment on indeterminate tomatoes, they were able to start harvesting their crop more than 3 weeks sooner than their control group!

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As a result of their experiments, Lang has placed in the top-3 in two state science fair competitions.

Nowadays, they’re looking into using clones to keep the genetic variability between samples as close as possible, allowing them to fine-tune the process.

  • Keith

    This just came out recently. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=El7OtqIkSLc

    Here is how it works. The electromagnetic energy in sunlight generates an electric potential on a nano particle, thus helping it to separate water into molecular Hydrogen and Oxygen. Then a microbe sucks up the hydrogen using it as fuel for the microbe which then at a later time fixes nitrogen. Aside from the energy being sourced from sunlight on nano particles, is this truly different than electric horticulture where a DC current is passed through soils? Certainly some hydrogen is being produced and a lot of microbes in the soil love this free hydrogen. Is some of this helping nitrogen fixing bacteria in the soils?

    • Keith

      I suspect that very modest soil currents are helping provide some of the energy to microbes in the soil, some of which are nitrogen fixing, providing nitrogen to the plants.