Category: electroculture

Nature & Electricity – Part 2: Natural Earth Currents and Plant Health Note: This article is part 2 of a chapter excerpt from our book on Electro-Horticulture. Enjoy… If you missed the previous posts that were a part of this series, check out part 1. In this mini-series, the goal is to focus on the […]

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Note: This article is part 1 of a chapter excerpt from our book on Electro-Horticulture. Enjoy… The fabric of all things in physical form on this planet is based on elemental atomic structure. Biological entities are composed of interconnected cellular structures forming tissues, organs and biochemical networks. At the core are atomic elements, each of […]

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To be fair, not all forms of electricity are beneficial to plants.  For example, I’d like to take a moment and share with you a snippet from a 2011 science report, “The effect of a direct electric current on the germination and growth of seeds of Phaseolus vulgaris, Raphanus sativby and Cucumis sativus and growth […]

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If you haven’t read the previous post about the joint Washington University / City of St. Louis Sustainable Land Lab Competition, check out the previous post, here.  Here’s the update… We, the Sunflower+ Team, was one of the final winners in the competition along with 4 other teams! Now that we have won the competition, […]

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To honor the passing of the 12/21/12 marker as set by the Mayans and others, e.g. the Hopi, I Ching, etc., I’m writing this post to briefly highlight some of the amazing potentials that are possible with the shift in consciousness that we’re in the middle of. Now I realize that this may all seem […]

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Hello readers!  Ever since I launched this site I’ve been using as a place to host some articles I’ve written – articles that allow me to show off my interest and love electro-horticulture and the amazing potentials that it holds for the future of gardening and farming. Today I want to do something a little […]

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Introduction When people started experimenting with growing crops faster using electricity, one of the most popular approaches was using direct-current power supplies as the means of producing electricity.  So, around the time of the turn of the 19th century, experimenters used an adaptation of early battery technology to generate electric current.  Early battery designs are […]

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